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In the vulgar Latin, it is where the etymological origin of the verb is found to find us now. It is exactly derived from the expression "in contra", which can be translated as "against". However, it is no less true that over time that term was also established as a synonym for "find."

Find is find or discover what you are looking for .

For example: “How am I going to do to find the hoop that I dropped? It is too small to detect with the naked eye ”, "Those who travel this part of the jungle can find toucans, parrots, vipers and other animals", "I think I won't be able to find someone like her".

Many times the idea of finding is linked to the effective or successful search resolution . If a woman goes out to tour clothing stores with the intention of finding red pants, her mission will come to an end when she detects the item in question in a business. Then she can say that she found the pants she was looking for.

In other cases, finding assumes bump into something or someone without looking for it . Suppose a Teen he walks through a park when, by chance, he crosses his cousin. Neither of us knew that the other was going to be walking around that place. The encounter, therefore, was unforeseen.

In the same way, we cannot ignore the existence of expressions that we use colloquially and that use the term that concerns us. This would be the case, for example, of "finding love." This means falling in love and finding that half-orange that is talked about so much.

It is considered that those who want to find love what they should do is be positive, participate in activities or attend places where there are people who share the same tastes, not to be dragged solely by sexual desire but to look beyond that, be themselves at all times, expand your social life, be patient ...

In addition, there is also the widely used expression of “finding a job” or the saying of “finding a needle in a haystack”.

In the field of literature, for example, we come across a long list of books that use the term in question in their titles. Among those are “Where to find peace” by Jiddu Krishnamurti, “How to find love at fifty” by Pascal Morin or “A day to find a husband” by Shirley Jump, for example.

The act of finding can also be linked to exercise an opposition or a confrontation ("The players had a tough game on the field and then continued to argue in the changing room area"). It can also relate to being in a certain state ("I never thought I was going to be sick on my wedding day").

Finding, finally, can be accessing something that causes surprise : "Bautista did not know that he was going to meet such a scenario when he returned home", “When he entered the theater, he met a crowd that cheered him”.

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